Posts

Showing posts from August, 2018

He is dead, but I still remember what happened.

Image
5 November 2017

When someone dies, do the memories you have of them die with them? Does the effect they had on your life slowly pass away after they have been buried? Do the secrets between the two of you finally stop being a burden on your life?
So far it seems they are not quite, not at all, and maybe if you try hard enough.

I woke up a few weeks ago wondering if maybe I'd remembered the whole thing wrong. He didn't invite me under a blanket. I wasn't about 4 or 5. He didn't actually put his finger into my vagina. I didn't giggle. He didn't ask me if I liked it. He didn't do it again. My uncle wasn't in the room.
I didn't mention in passing to my parents, while they were dressing me, that my cousin had told me "that is for adults" while I indicated my private parts. That didn't happen, My parents didn't tell me not to go into my cousin's room again.
I'm remembering it wrong.
He didn't actually touch me there. Because t…

[Review] When Dimple met Rishi

Image
We are familiar with the loose structure of a romantic comedy: the meet-cute, a “big reveal” that strengthens the connection between the two characters, a moment that changes everything (and increases the momentum of the relationship), the breakdown that very nearly causes the end of the relationship, the Big Romantic Gesture ™ leading to the reunion, and then the happily ever after, or they eventually get it together for a few good years, whichever comes first.
If you have a quirky name for your romcom, or you create characters who deal with issues that are current or – even better – underrepresented, then you get extra points.

Sandhya Menon’s When Dimple met Rishi ticks all the romcom boxes. The play on Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan’s iconic film immediately lets you know two things: the two main characters will be from different worlds and will hate each other; at the end of it all, they will be together and they will be happy. In this way, then, reading Menon’s book is not about seei…